Yes, but only if it is the right omega-3. Even a few years ago, most experts thought the brain was unaffected by dietary intake and also unable to regenerate. All of that has changed. Now we know that 66% of brain aging is within our control and diet plays a huge part in staying mentally sharp. The omega-3 fats in seafood, EPA and DHA, are critical building blocks of healthy brain cells. In fact, 97% of the omega-3s in the brain are DHA. But, your body can’t make this fat. It must come from the diet. No wonder researchers have found that people who consume ample amounts of DHA maintain better memories and are up to 60% less likely to develop dementia. DHA also reduces depression by up to 50% even in people who are the most difficult to treat and depression rates are 60 times lower in countries where people consume the most DHA, which is why even the American Psychiatric Association in 2006 added this fat to their recommendations for treating depression. In addition, a recent study from Oxford found that DHA supplements even improved reading by up to 50% in children and curbed behavioral problems. Stay tuned: Preliminary research is investigating the link with DHA and attention deficit, autism, and other neurological problems. Aim for at least 2 servings a week of DHA-rich salmon, include DHA-fortified foods in the diet, or take a supplement that supplies at least 220 milligrams of DHA. The omega-3 fat in flax, walnuts, soy, etc, called ALA, has not been found at this time to have any impact on brain health.